Doing it right in 1915:
A Handbook for Campers in the National Forests in California

The following is a reproduction of the second edition of William G. Hodge’s Handbook for Campers in the National Forests in California; the first edition was issued in 1908. Hodge was a Forest Inspector for the Forest Service’s District Five, the division that administered the national forests in California. The booklet became popular nationwide, and thus in 1916 the Forest Service in Washington D. C. requested that the California office reprint the publication as soon as the supplies were exhausted.(1) A third edition, which was slightly revised, was published in 1921.
As it will be seen, what is now the Monterey Ranger District of Los Padres National Forest was then a separate forest that was known as the Monterey National Forest. The Monterey forest was comprised of two divisions, the Coast Division and the San Benito Division; the later encompassed the San Benito Mountain region of southeastern San Benito County and adjacent areas of Fresno and Monterey counties. In 1916 the San Benito Division was eliminated, and in 1919 the Monterey National Forest became part of the Santa Barbara National Forest (in 1936 the Santa Barbara National Forest was renamed as Los Padres National Forest). Over the years there have been many similar changes in regards to the boundaries and names for other national forests in California. For example, what is referred to in the following text as the California National Forest is now the Mendocino National Forest, and the San Bernardino National Forest, which was one of the first to be established in California, was then temporarily part of the Angeles National Forest.
As stated in the following text, the Supervisor of the Monterey National Forest at that time was Norman H. Sloane; Sloane held this position from December of 1911 to March of 1916. During his tenure Sloane authored a text titled Resources and Plan of Operation of Monterey National Forest, which contains a wealth of information about the early history of the Monterey Ranger District of Los Padres National Forest.
The following text also states that the headquarters of the Monterey National Forest was located in “Arbolado, Monterey County, Cal.” Arbolado was a former name for what is now known as the Big Sur Village (the Big Sur Post Office was known as the Arbolado Post Office from 1910 to 1915). In May of 1911 the headquarters of the Monterey National Forest was moved from its original location in Salinas to “Opposite J. Pfeiffer’s farm house, on the Big Sur.”(2) At that time the forest actually had two seasonal headquarters. The Chew’s Ridge Station, due to its nearby lookout, telephone connection and regular mail deliveries via the Tassajara stage, served as the summer headquarters, while the Big Sur Station served as the winter headquarters.(3) At some date between June of 1915 and January of 1916 the headquarters was moved to King City.

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1 Godfrey, Anthony. The Ever-Changing View, A History of the National Forests in California. USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, July, 1905.

2 “Lime Plant on the Sur is Closed,” Salinas Daily Index, 6.26.1911.

3 Sloane, Norman H. Resources and Plan of Operation of Monterey National Forest. This unpublished typescript is dated February 1914