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North Coast Ridge Trail

Cone Peak Road to Cook Springs

Postby dknapp1 on Fri Jun 19, 2009 9:38 pm

Date Hiked: June 6, 2009
General Condition: Clear (no obstacles and tread well defined)

The NCRT from Cone Peak road to Cook Springs is mostly clear, with tread issues in several places. There has been recent work on the trail that was not performed by the VWA trail crew, though on this trip we cleared about 300 feet of scree, did some brushing, and helped to reroute the horseshoe near the saddle.

Brush is encroaching the trail, especially on the lower part, however past the saddle, the trail is clear, with minor tread issues.

None of the turnoffs are signed - gamboa, carrizo, and cook springs are all unlabeled. In addition, the location of Cook Springs is wrong on most maps.

We have cleared the turn off to Cook Springs to make it obvious.

Here is a pic of the turnoff from the south, looking north.
The turn off is on the right.

Image

Looking south, you can also see the rock cairn, and the three young pine trees with trimmed lower limbs.

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David Knapp, Trail Crew Chief
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Coast Ridge Trail Conditions History

Postby Site Administrator on Tue May 12, 2009 4:57 pm

Date Hiked: May 10, 2008
General Condition: Passable (some brush and/or deadfalls, tread evident)

* USFS trail #3E10, road #20S05
* Parking: North: Big Sur Station ($4/day) South: Cone Peak Road
NOTE: The first 18 miles of this route when followed from Big Sur southward is a maintained dirt road. As such, the conditions are pretty predictable for the foot or horseback traveler and detailed description here is limited to the southerly "trail" portion.
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Conditions reported by: George
Survey date: 10-May-2008
General: Passable
Specific:

Section: Rodeo Flat junction to Lost Valley Connector Junction
Hiked from Rodeo Flats trail to Lost Valley Connector. Took a wrong turn not too far past the start: instead of going left I went straight at some point right along the ridgecrest and ended up with no (or at least very overgrown) trail. Had to bushwack left (ocean-side) to pick up the obvious roadcut. A bit brushy but not too bad otherwise. The "spring" had a small flowing trickle of water, but it looked very difficult to obtain any to drink. One must be alert for where the topo and the remains of a sign indicate the LV Connector heads sharply back to the on a thin tread.
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Conditions reported by: Lindsay Jeffers (Stevenson Wilderness Expedition)
Survey date: 2-MARCH-2008
General: DIFFICULT
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Road to Cook Spring Camp Trail - Mostly Clear

There were lots of fresh dead falls and brush. Stevenson crews did some clearing to improve this, but lots of work remains. However, the trail is basically clear. Heavy snow accumulations on the scree slopes required cutting steps in order to bring the group though safely, but the snow will not last too much longer.

Section: Cook Spring Camp Trail to Rodeo Flat Trail - Difficult

There are many spots which are barely passable. Lots of new fallen timber and fresh brush in the trail make this a difficult and frustrating route, despite the generally wide road bed that the trail employs.

Section: Rodeo Flat Trail to Lost Valley Connector - Clear

This section is much clearer and is closer to what one wishes the rest of the trail were like.
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Conditions reported by: Joshua Billings
Survey date: 6-OCTOBER-2007
General: CLEAR
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Road to First Saddle - Clear

Parking at the end of Cone Peak Rd. we hiked along the Coast Ridge Trail. The trail is clear.
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Conditions reported by: Reed Thayer
Survey date: 3-JUNE-2007
General: DIFFICULT
Specific:

Section: Lost Valley Connector to Rodeo Flats Trail - Passable

The brush mainly ranges from ankle to waist high, although there are a few short places where the brush is over your head. The spring is seeping. A little before the junction with the Rodeo Flats Trail, you will see a fire road winding steeply up a hill. Turn right before the hill onto the actual Coast Ridge Road. It's much easier. The junction with the Rodeo Flats Trail can be easily spotted if you look for a sign that pointing towards "Forks".

Section: Rodeo Flats Trail to Arroyo Seco Trail - Difficult/near Impassable

Just after the Rodeo Flats Trail (Southbound), the trail conditions deteriorate considerably. It is almost entirely a solid wall of pollen coated brush and baby trees for this section of trail. The brush is so thick that you will nt be able to see your feet. Expect to spend over an hour acting like a football player barging through this nearly impenetrable brush. Even if you are tall like me, you will not be able to avoid being whacked in the face. Fortunately, you can tell by the fact that you are on a flat route that you are on the trail.

I advise that anyone who is not fit and has not had considerable experience with hiking through 7' tall brush should not take this section of trail. It took 2 athletic teenagers (us) at least 1 1/2 hours to negotiate this section.

As for the Arroyo Seco Trail Junction, it is signed. There is something that looks like a junction about 1/4 mile before it that is not signed, so don't take it.
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Conditions reported by: Carl A. Mounteer
Survey date: 1-MAY-2007
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Road

First, there is a lot of brush encroaching on the Cone Peak Road. This forces you to drive in the middle of the road and having the vegetation brush your car is unavoidable at times. The Cone Peak Road is much improved in one portion where there was a nasty, deeply rutted marble patch with lots of sharp rocks in the road. That has been well graded over.

Section: Cone Peak Road to Carrizo (Dozer Cut) Trail - Passable

The first 3/4 mile of the Coast Ridge Trail is very clear in spots. But it is plagued by landslides. The latter is probably the reason why the road, that is now the trail, originally here was abandoned. The landslides make the trail very faint in parts. It must be a constant battle to keep the tread evident.

There is one section of the early part of trail that calls for a great deal of caution. Switchbacks take you down a short way and then there is a long strenous uphill portion of switchbacks. This begins about about 3/4 mile from the Cone Peak Road trailhead. After you finish this uphill climb, the trail levels off. There is one portion of this level portion of the trail that is about one foot wide with a sheer 100 foot drop off the trail. Much caution and alertness should be exercised here.

After emerging from the foot of Cone Peak, where one has a view of the ocean, one encounters in patches lots of warty-leafed ceonthus as well as a bush with tiny white flowers. This brush is about six feet high in places and requires pushing through in some intervals. But, despite this, the tread remained clear.

Editor's Note: Cook Spring/Carrizo Trail junction confusion.

Travelling north on the Coast Ridge Trail, from the left junction with the Gamboa Trail, first there is a somewhat obscure junction to the right that leads to the historic tread of the Carrizo Trail...this becomes impassable in a third of a mile. After crossing a saddle and contouring for a while the trail turns and crosses a ridge, the right junction there is the dozer cut down to the Carrizo Trail. The next short section is on a distinct roadcut liberally decorated with deadfall in the 2-4 foot range, after less than a 1/4 mile of this, there is a huge pine (5' diameter) entirely across the roadbed, the Cook Spring Trail branches eastward on on the south side of the log.
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Conditions reported by: Andrew Staley
Survey date: 2-APRIL-2007
General: CLEAR
Specific:

Section: Rodeo Flats Trail to Lost Valley Trail - Passable

Chaparral armor [is recommended] as the brush is both uncomfortably thick and high. Actual junction with the Rodeo Flats Trail is difficult to locate coming from either direction.
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Conditions reported by: EW
Survey date: 23-DECEMBER-2006
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Gate 6 to Bee Camp Trail - Clear

From the last locked gate, the trail navigates between tall ceanothus and yerba santa, reaches a saddle and then intersects the Bee Camp Trail, a small cairn marks the trail down to brushy Upper Bee Camp.

Section: Bee Camp Trail to Lost Valley Connector - Passable

From Bee Camp Trail southward, the route is often wide open ridge top travel on bulldozer-cut firebreaks, occasional sidehill traverses make for more gradual walking, but tend to be more overgrown. Saddles are most overgrown and occasionally difficult to penetrate, chaparral body armor recommended.

Section: Lost Valley Connector to Arroyo Seco Trail - Difficult

At Lost Valley Connector, I expected the trail to become more clear but was sorely disappointed. From here the Coast Ridge Trail is quite well-engineered, with sidehill traverses eliminating the necessity for the brutal climbing and descending of ridgetop firebreaks, but ceanothus and chamise have thoroughly invaded the tread - chaparral body armor is basically essential all the way past Rodeo Flat to the start of Arroyo Seco Trail.

Section: Arroyo Seco Trail to Gamboa Trail - Clear/Passable

From this intersection, the work of numerous VWA trail crew outings makes for very clear and enjoyable hiking. Ascending to Tin Can Camp, massive Santa Lucia (Junipero Serra) Peak, framed with old growth Sugar Pine is a stirring sight. From Tin Can Camp to the start of the Cook Spring Camp Trail a few large deadfalls are easily circumvented. From the Cook Spring Trail to the Gamboa Trail, the Coast Ridge Trail is in great shape and easily followed.
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Conditions reported by: Will
Survey date: 20 DECEMBER-2006
General: DIFFICULT
Specific:

Incredibly overgrown in parts, expect to tear your clothes and your skin. Staying on the right track is easy enough, the roadbed is still relatively obvious, but following the route takes effort. In places the chapparal is almost impassable, especially just north of the Arroyo Seco Junction.
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Conditions reported by: Robert Parks
Survey date: 8-OCTOBER-2006
General: CLEAR
Specific:

Section: Arroyo Seco Trail to West of Tin Can Camp - Clear

A large crawl-under pine was removed from the trail, and a downed tanoak crawl-under was trimmed, allowing easy passage along this section of trail. There remain several small logs and deadfalls that cause minor diversions. There is one section of encroaching Yerba Santa near the Arroyo Seco junction.
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Conditions reported by: Steven Gravenites
Survey date: 1-MAY-2006
General: DIFFICULT
Specific:

Section: Gamboa Trail? to Cold Springs Camp - Difficult

Having just completed a thru-hike from Cone Peak to Cold Springs, I would have to say that this trail is in danger of becoming IMPASSABLE this year! Recent fires, landslides,deadfalls, lack of signage or trail work and completely overgrown trail have made this a real tough trail to complete. Most of the signs are burnt or missing. Yerba Santa and Coyote brush have dominated to the point of solidity. Having to by-pass the true road bed trail at times to make forward progress has caused erosion as well. I did make my way through, but luckily it was a cool clear day. What a shame such a nice trail is so trashed.
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Conditions reported by: Robert Parks
Survey date: 11-DECEMBER-2005
General: CLEAR
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Road to Cook Spring Camp Trail - Passable

No change in tread conditions, brush continues to encroach in various sections, and a number of mostly small and easy to cross deadfalls are now on the trail. The huge pine log across the trail at the Cook Spring Camp Trail has been liberally decorated with shiny debris.

Section: Cook Spring Camp Trail to Tin Can Camp - Passable

Brush growth and deadfalls on and across the trail (old road) cause the tread to snake around, but do not provide much in the way of obstacles.

Section: Tin Can Camp to Arroyo Seco Trail - Wilderness Freeway

Except for a short, easy diversion around a large log near Tin Can Camp deadfalls and brush have been cleared from the trail.
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Conditions reported by: Robert Parks
Survey date: 24-APRIL-2005
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Coast Ridge Road trailhead to Gamboa Trail junction - Passable

The old roadbed near the trailhead continues to deteriorate, the two major washouts are spreading, but still easily crossable, there is also a rough section where loose rock from the cut has rolled across the old roadbed.

The tread is in decent to good condition to the Gamboa Trail, although brush is growing in quickly.

Section: Gamboa Trail junction to Old Carrizo Trail junction - Passable

The tread is in good condition, and, of course, brush is growing in quickly. The large deadfall on the trail is still present, I trimmed it a bit so it is easier to clamber across.
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Conditions reported by: Rob Yang
Survey date: 10-APRIL-2005
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Gate north of Bee Camp junction to Rodeo Flat junction (Passable)

Just north of the Lost Valley Connector was a section with high and thick yerba santa. I would have spent time uprooting it if I hadn't had a lot of distance to cover that day. Generally though the views were fantastic. Redondo Spring and Rodeo Flat both had plentiful water.
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Conditions reported by: Jeffrey Zimmerman
Survey date: 31-MARCH-2005
General: WILDERNESS FREEWAY
Specific:

Section: Timber Top Camp

Fabulous views, a sturdy wooden table, spectacular wildflower display, even a sign announcing the site name. What's missing? Water. The nearest official water is Cold Spring to the south, or Terrace Creek to the north. There're two water tanks atop the hill, but there's no publically available tap on either. There are also two cattle troughs with rainwater (or, rather, what USED to be rainwater and is now some sort of black sludge) in them. Access from the north is by a road which parallels the CRR for a few hundred yards north of TT, then turns to it by a dozer cut. Access from the south is by a dozer cut just as the CRR turns from northbound to eastbound to loop around the hill. Access from the west is a long steep climb up the Boronda trail. Access from the east is a steep bushwack. Some cowflop was present but rather old and dry. No skeeters, some deer tracks, and no other wildlife. Lupine and sage and buttercups and bluebells and forget-me-nots in wild profusion, poppies and paintbrush yet to come. The picnic table has to be one of the last classic tables in good condition in the Forest. In short, a scenic but dry destination.
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Conditions reported by: Lindsay Jeffers - Stevenson Wilderness Program
Survey date: 1-MARCH-2005
General: CLEAR
Specific:

Section: North Coast Ridge Road/Cone Peak Road to Cook Spring Trail (Clear)

From the Cone Peak Road there are a couple of places where slumping is making the trail a little precarious. Other that that, brush and deadfalls are present but not too significant.

Section: Cook Spring Trail to Arroyo Seco Trail (Clear)

The trail is clear, with a bit of timber, which we cleared, near the top of the Arroyo Seco Trail. Section: Arroyo Seco Trail to Rodeo Flats Trail (Clear)

To Rodeo Flats, the way is open except where various plants have grown up in the old road-bed. Here, the trail zigs and zags around the brush and adds appreciably to the time and distance one must walk. There are a few blowdowns that require creeping under them and one that seemed best traversed by handing packs over to someone on the other side.

Section: Rodeo Flats Trail to Lost Valley Connector (Wilderness Highway)

The trail is a wilderness highway to the Lost Valley Connector, with very little more brush except in one or two spots where seeping water has encouraged willow to encroach on the trail.
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Conditions reported by: HM
Survey date: 17-APRIL-2004
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Rd. end to Arroyo Seco Tr. jct.

The most difficult parts were in the previously burned (and currently eroded) sections, close to the trailhead at Cone Peak Road. On some of these, the rocks were not very stable, and the switchbacks were steep. The intersection with Gamboa Trail was well marked, but we never saw the Carrizo Trail or Cook Spring Camp. The intersection with Arroyo Seco Trail is very well marked, with an old wooden sign that also posts mileage to various points.
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Conditions reported by: Lindsay Jeffers - Stevenson Wilderness Expedition
Survey date: 02-MAR-2004
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Coast Ridge Trail (Gamboa Trail jct. to Arroyo Seco Trail)

Good shape with a couple of blowdowns near Cook Springs. Carrizo Trail was marked with some tape. Cook Springs is as usual although water wasn't running very well (worst I have seen it), which was a surprise with the way all the other springs were running this year.
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Conditions reported by: Robert Parks
Survey date: 20-MAR-2004
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Road end to Cook Spring Camp Trail

The old road portion (first 1/2 mile) is either very good, if rocky or it is in moderately bad shape. There are several sections crossing gullies where the old roadbed is (nearly) gone, and one place where a nasty bedrock gully is one major gully washer away from closing the trail (absent major work). For now it is passable

From the old road to the saddle, it varies, either being encroached on by brush or subject to the vagaries of the debris slopes there, some large deadfalls have diverted the trail and there are some rough spots.

From the Saddle to just short of the Cook Springs Camp Trail the tread is good, with mostly low brush encroaching to some degree, especially on the east facing parts. The Gamboa Trail junction is unmarked, a steep use trail replaces the lost tread of that trail (only the last 100 feet or so is lost). No water. Some large deadfalls just north of the Gamboa Trail junction, easily crossed.

The section within a few hundred yards of the Cook Springs Camp Trail goes through the burned remains of a mature pine forest. There are very large deadfalls entirely blocking the tread (old road), crossable by use trail bypass, otherwise clear. The Cook Springs Camp Trail is unsigned, although an enhanced cairn is present as of this date. Fairly obvious old road connection. Water at Cook Spring.
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Conditions reported by: Carl A. Mounteer
Survey date: 18-JAN-2004
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: Cone Peak Rd. end to Gamboa Trail jct.

You had to pay attention to keep track of the trail in this interval. About 1/4 of a mile in from the trailhead a landslide completely obliterated the trail for about 75 feet. Luckily, it was easily negotiated and the continuation of the trail straight ahead was evident. There was one tree blocking the trail but that was easily climbed over. There is no water on this portion of the trail.
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Conditions reported by: Steve Wilson
Survey date: 28-MAr-2003
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Section: End of Coast Ridge Road (Gate 6 per Schaffer) south to Lost Valley Connector.

Brush is continuing to encroach, but I think the lack of topsoil resulting from its dozer cut origins is impeding growth a little bit. Despite brush (generally less than 4 ft high) and light use, its industrial beginnings makes it hard to lose your way. Junction to Bee Camp trail marked only with a marble cairn that I could see. Junction with old route to Lower Bee marked with small copper plate sign. Junction with Lost Valley Connector marked with old wooden sign.
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Conditions reported by: Ojai Valley School - "Las Papas Gigantescas"
Survey date: APRIL-MAY, 2002
General: WILDERNESS FREEWAY to PASSABLE
Specific:

North Coast Ridge Trail: Lost Valley Connector to Gamboa Trail Junction:
Mixed terrain ranging from very clear to brushy in places as you head South. Confusing break in trail where bulldozer track heads uphill and left, and real trail descends briefly and right into camp before climbing back out (it was very cold and foggy with light snow flurries). Rodeo Flat and Arroyo Seco Trails well signed. Turn off East to Cook Springs was unsigned and tough to spot (fog made it hard to see at times and it dropped the temp. significantly). We assumed it to be near a fallen tree, and taped wire that hung across the trail overhead.
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Conditions reported by: Stevenson School Wilderness Expedition
Survey date: FEB-2002
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Gamboa Trail to Lost Valley Connector:
The trail is in good enough shape. The junction down to Cook Springs is flagged at the big fallen tree, but one still needs to pay attention or risk missing it. The trail down to Cook Springs Camp is in very poor condition with lots of downed trees and very steep and slippery ground. There are flags on the tricky spots. The old road route, which is supposed to be easier, is covered with fallen trees and essentially useless. North from the Cook Springs junction, there are many trees across the next mile or two to the north, but all can be stepped over or gone under. They do not bar travel on the trail/road, which remains open and easy to follow as far as the Lost Valley Connector. The contouring shortcut from just above and north of the stream crossing at Rodeo Flats is open and well worth taking. The brush is mostly cleared and the foot bed is mostly level. The views are spectacular.
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Conditions reported by: Rob Yang
Survey date: 23-FEB-2002
General: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Specific:

From Cone Peak Rd end to Cook Spring intersection - clear from the road end up to the junction with Gamboa, which was flagged and also had some ducks. The blowdowns didn't start until after that. Flags were also in place at the Cook Spring trail junction.
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Conditions reported by: Rob Yang
Survey date: 12-January-2002
General: CLEAR to DIFFICULT
Specific:

The views were phenomenal from this ridge - I had to keep pinching myself to remember this was January. There are some *big* burned pines down across the trail, some of which were a little hairy to maneuver around/across/under. I made my way to the bend a little ways beyond the Cook Spring junction and could see the Cone Peak lookout from there.
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Conditions reported by: Rob Yang
Survey date: 12-January-2002
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

The views from this stretch were great - Ventana Double Cone and Lost Valley to the north, the sea and canyons to the south. Just west of the Lost Valley Connector there was a quarter mile or so where the brush was thick enough to obscure the tread, but the desired route wasn't too hard to figure out (ridge line).
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Conditions reported by: Rob Yang
Survey date: 12-January-2002
General: CLEAR to PASSABLE
Specific:

From Lost Valley Connector to Rodeo Flat things seemed to be pretty much as per the last report. The spring halfway was dripping. There was also a creeklet flowing across the trail just a few hundred yards down from Rodeo Flat, with a fire ring and a bedsite with room for a tent or two.

Heading uphill from Rodeo Flat the trail got a little indistinct and brushy, but I found it helpful again to remember to follow the ridge line. Views were incredible. Intermittent brush continued to Arroyo Seco.
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Conditions reported by: Steve Wilson
Survey date: 14-APRIL-01
General: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Specific: Yerba Santa Slalom

RODEO FLATS TO ARROYO SECO JUNCTION: CLEAR TO PASSABLE

Just an update to the preceeding reports. The fire cleared out most of the view and path obstructing brush. On a sunny, cool April day the views were endless, albeit filtered through cooked chapparel and humidity at times. Yerba Santa is proliferating, as it tends to do after a fire, especially along the road cut sections. But it is soft and the serpentine use path is easily followed around the few obstacles. Didn't encounter very many deadfalls, and most of the dead material was brush, not trees. On the hillsides, under the burnt canopy of black and gray sticks, lies a green, succulent carpet of young brush regrowth. The junction with the Rodeo Flats trail is marked with a wooden sign that escaped the fire, as well as a tall metal post; Arroyo Seco Junction is encountered at a fire ring on the saddle from the North. A wooden guidance sign is located just east. Mining Ridge still topped with snow patches. While clear for now, bring your clippers along, snip as you go, and it will easily be kept that way.
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Conditions reported by: Stevenson School Wilderness Expedition 2000
Survey date: APRIL-2000
General: PASSABLE
Specific:

Arroyo Seco Trail to the Lost Valley connector= PASSABLE-BRUSHY

From the Arroyo Seco Trail to the Rodeo Flat Trail the going is a little brushy, but discernable and wide. There is a lot of new growth that must have burned, making it tough to push through at times. From the Rodeo Flat Trail to Lost Valley the trail is clear and fine, though the junction at the Connector is hard to distinguish.

The trail that contours along the western slopes north of Rodeo Flats below the Coast Ridge Road is completely burned over, hence easy to follow. The foot bed is nearly lost in places due to erosion, though. Unless this is worked on, the trail will probably disappear, which would be a disappointment for people traveling south on the Coast Ridge who can use it to cut off a climb up one more hilltop. It is nice to leave the road for a while and walk on a trail, and the brush is no longer a problem.
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Conditions reported by: Steve Chambers
Survey date: 23-MARCH-00
General: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Specific:

RODEO FLATS TO ARROYO SECO JUNCTION: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Almost all of this stretch of trail was heavily burnt during the fire. There are burnt downfalls to climb over, and many burnt brush sticks to wind around within the trail/road area.
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Conditions reported by: Steve Chambers
Survey date: 28-MARCH-00
General: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Specific:

GAMBOA TRAIL TO CONE PEAK ROAD: PASSABLE TO DIFFICULT
Fire Crews worked on this section of trail after the fire installing water bars and chain sawing trees and brush along the trail. Since this work last fall, some sections of tread are completely filled in due to upslope erosion. This makes passage difficult to dangerous due to the existing steep slopes the trail cuts through. As the filled in material dries out, footing will be even more difficult.
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Conditions reported by: Steve Chambers
Survey date: 23-MARCH-00
General: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Specific:

ARROYO SECO TO CARRIZO JUNCTION: CLEAR TO PASSABLE
Almost all of this stretch of trail was heavily burnt during the fire. There are burnt downfalls to climb over, and many burnt brush sticks to wind around within the trail/road area.
===========
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Coast Ridge Trail

Postby Site Administrator on Tue May 12, 2009 4:55 pm

Image
* USFS trail #3E10, road #20S05
* Parking: North: Big Sur Station ($4/day) South: Cone Peak Road
* Watersheds: Various
* Junctions: Terrace Creek Trail, Boronda Trail, de Angulo Trail, Big Sur Trail, Marble Peak Trail, Bee Camp Trail, Lost Valley Connector, Rodeo Flats Trail, Arroyo Seco Trail, Cook Spring Trail, Carrizo Trail, Gamboa Trail
* Connects: Hwy 1 at Ventana Inn with Cone Peak Road
* Camps: Timber Top (dry), Cold Spring, Upper Bee, Cook Spring Camp
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